Ingrid: Jamii Bora benevolutionary

“Ingrid can walk through any slum in Nairobi without fear for her security. She is known and loved by the street people who she has always been good to. She is considered a white-skinned African.” Micro-credit, alongside being seen, heard, understood, believed in, and...

Putting the Kenya Crossing Blog to Bed

Ah, a fresh new baby year…may we meet it as such, with tenderness, love, and no small amount of wonder. I wanted to share a few final reflections on our trip to Kenya and some of my favorite pictures as a way of tipping my hat to this adventure. Thank you for your...

Kaputiei Town – Home is Where the Hope Is

Named after one of the Masaii tribes in the area, Kaputiei was conceived from Ingrid’s belief that “you can’t move out of poverty if you are living in hell.” The land for Kaputiei was acquired through great travail (and that is a story all on its own) in 2002 and is...
Putting the Kenya Crossing Blog to Bed

Putting the Kenya Crossing Blog to Bed

Ah, a fresh new baby year…may we meet it as such, with tenderness, love, and no small amount of wonder. I wanted to share a few final reflections on our trip to Kenya and some of my favorite pictures as a way of tipping my hat to this adventure. Thank you for your...

read more
Kaputiei Town – Home is Where the Hope Is

Kaputiei Town – Home is Where the Hope Is

Named after one of the Masaii tribes in the area, Kaputiei was conceived from Ingrid’s belief that “you can’t move out of poverty if you are living in hell.” The land for Kaputiei was acquired through great travail (and that is a story all on its own) in 2002 and is...

read more
Jamii Bora – The Power in the Programs

Jamii Bora – The Power in the Programs

Ingrid often expresses her gratitude that Jamii Bora was created in her later years rather than when she was a young woman. If it had, she asserts, she would have made the mistake that so many organizations with a mission to help end up making. The gist of which is,...

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Our world is changing. Our thinking patterns are shifting. To answer our pressing emergencies and, fortuitously, engaging in this brings an aliveness like nothing else.

We’re a worldwide civilisation now and can consciously engage in creating thriving, just, sustainable futures for everyone. Yet, sometimes, this seems like a very lonely path…

We hope this site helps us all accelerate positive shifts. Amplification, re-storying and sharing awe…

Jamii Bora – Better than Good

Jamii Bora – Better than Good

Jamii is the plural of family in Swahili Bora is good, but not just good, better than good Like many beautiful unfoldings, the initial seeds of Jamii Bora were sewn with no idea about what yield would eventually follow. Ingrid Munro grew up in Sweden and had a rather...

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Culture Shock Kenya Style, Part 2

Culture Shock Kenya Style, Part 2

Editorial note: In a previous blog I stated that the population in Kibera slum is close to 2 million. There appears to be quite a bit of disagreement and uncertainty on this figure. A 2009 census put the number much lower: around 171,000. That may reflect the many...

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Culture Shock Kenya Style, Part 1

Culture Shock Kenya Style, Part 1

Swahili language and greetings lesson of the day: Mzungu-a European, but really any white person Mutatu-Mini-van straight out of Mad Max, people packed in like sardines, a “solicitor” hanging out of the open door shrieking for potential customers, drives on sidewalks...

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Back From the Bush

Back From the Bush

Giraffe trivia, match the following: Maasai Giraffe, Reticulated Giraffe, Rothschild Giraffe The most endangered subspecies, Can interbreed with other giraffe subspecies, The largest subspecies (answers at the end of the blog) The sadness of leaving our new friends...

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The Maasai: Fierce Warriors, Gentle Pastoralists

The Maasai: Fierce Warriors, Gentle Pastoralists

Swahili lesson of the day: Manyatta-House         Boma-Family compound       Ngombe-Cow          Mbuzi-Goat The Maasai people living in the Maasai Mara region today hail from a very old ethnic group of semi-nomadic people located in Kenya and northern Tanzania who...

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Welcome to the slum

Welcome to the slum

Where is her mother, her father? Does she even have a mother, a father? When was the last time she ate? Was that the last time she ever would? These questions, accompanied by so many emotions, continue to race through my mind. They keep me awake at night. Such a...

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Festina Lente

Make haste – slowly, powerfully, minimally

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“Hasten slowly” said Augustus. Oh, this is hard. To imagine what can be created, to hold back, to act; to engage means delving into both despair and hope. That’s where we’re challenged to see the powerful in what we do which is always minimal and micro. Feeling adequate in the face of manifest inadequacy. Weaving together the pieces that hasten, slowly and steadily, benevolution.

- Festina LentÍvaldi